moon-medicine:

nololzallowed:

moon-medicine:

herbal shampoo no. 2: catnip, peppermint, apple mint, lavender, chamomile, and moonshine yarrow.

What are the steps to making this into a shampoo?  Or is it just a simple infusion you rinse your hair with?

you could just use the herb infusion as a rinse but if you want to turn it into shampoo you can mix 4 oz of herb infused water with 2 oz castille soap (like dr.bronners) and a half teaspoon carrier oil (like hemp seed, almond, or olive) and then any essential oils you like too :) moon-medicine:

nololzallowed:

moon-medicine:

herbal shampoo no. 2: catnip, peppermint, apple mint, lavender, chamomile, and moonshine yarrow.

What are the steps to making this into a shampoo?  Or is it just a simple infusion you rinse your hair with?

you could just use the herb infusion as a rinse but if you want to turn it into shampoo you can mix 4 oz of herb infused water with 2 oz castille soap (like dr.bronners) and a half teaspoon carrier oil (like hemp seed, almond, or olive) and then any essential oils you like too :)

moon-medicine:

nololzallowed:

moon-medicine:

herbal shampoo no. 2: catnip, peppermint, apple mint, lavender, chamomile, and moonshine yarrow.

What are the steps to making this into a shampoo?  Or is it just a simple infusion you rinse your hair with?

you could just use the herb infusion as a rinse but if you want to turn it into shampoo you can mix 4 oz of herb infused water with 2 oz castille soap (like dr.bronners) and a half teaspoon carrier oil (like hemp seed, almond, or olive) and then any essential oils you like too :)

gwathir:

rose-infused vinegar

To make a rose infused vinegar fill a one pint jar full with fresh rose petals (or half way with dried) and fill to the top with a good quality organic apple cider vinegar. Place a small sheet of waxed paper on top of the jar before sealing because the vinegar will eat away at the metal top of the lid. Set on your counter and let steep for six weeks.

A cloth can be soaked in this mixture (dilute to 1 part vinegar to about 7-10 parts water) and can be placed on the forehead for tension or heat induced headaches, wrapped around a sprained ankle, or used to wash itchy bug bites and heat rashes. It excels at pulling heat from an inflamed area in a very short time. It is especially powerful at rapidly quenching the redness and pain from a sunburn in no time flat.

I bet a spritz is good on a salad, too.

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.
cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse.Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.

1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.

2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.

3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.

4. More kindling.

5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.

6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.

7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.

8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.

9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.

10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.
Dobby the kitten approves.

ericruby:

2012

southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last. southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last.

southern4perspective:

My cousin stopped by to help me harvest 8 rabbits for our 4th of July party this year. It was a an amazing party with the best neighbors one could have.

We prepared the rabbits in a verity of ways, in different smokers, served along with several other free range meats.

I also fried the rabbit livers and kidneys. Once the meats were ready to serve I topped of the plate with sautéed chanterelle mushrooms we foraged the day before.

The flavors will be remembered. Many have not had rabbit and we believe it won’t be their last.

beemill:

One Tree, 40 Types of Fruit

Ideas don’t grow on trees, until now.
Syracuse University Professor Sam Van Aken is the proud father of a single tree that grows 40 types of fruit. The artist’s rendering of his creation is getting attention worldwide, CBS News correspondent Jeff Glor reports.
"It’s flattering. It’s amazing. But yeah, it’s overwhelming," Van Aken said.
The art professor grew up on a farm in Pennsylvania. A few years ago, he learned New York’s agricultural experiment station — a 125-year-old institution that preserves and produces fruit — was going to rip up its stone fruit orchards.
So he set out to find a permanent home for seeds that trace back thousands of years.
"When I started, it was a matter of essentially collapsing an entire orchard down onto one tree. That was the practical application for it."
The result is not an entire orchard in one, but “a couple orchards in one.”
The tree contains 40 varieties of peaches, apricots, cherries, nectarines and European plums that date back to the 17th and 18th century.
Growing multiple stone fruits, like peaches or plums, on one tree is possible because what Van Aken does, perhaps better than anybody, is graft.
In essence, he tricks a tree into adopting a new limb, or in this case, dozens of them.
The Tree of 40 Fruit has been growing for nine years. Fourteen are installed around the country, most in public places, like Van Aken’s at the center of the Syracuse campus — alive and edible.

read more: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/tree-of-40-forty-fruit-sam-van-aken/ beemill:

One Tree, 40 Types of Fruit

Ideas don’t grow on trees, until now.
Syracuse University Professor Sam Van Aken is the proud father of a single tree that grows 40 types of fruit. The artist’s rendering of his creation is getting attention worldwide, CBS News correspondent Jeff Glor reports.
"It’s flattering. It’s amazing. But yeah, it’s overwhelming," Van Aken said.
The art professor grew up on a farm in Pennsylvania. A few years ago, he learned New York’s agricultural experiment station — a 125-year-old institution that preserves and produces fruit — was going to rip up its stone fruit orchards.
So he set out to find a permanent home for seeds that trace back thousands of years.
"When I started, it was a matter of essentially collapsing an entire orchard down onto one tree. That was the practical application for it."
The result is not an entire orchard in one, but “a couple orchards in one.”
The tree contains 40 varieties of peaches, apricots, cherries, nectarines and European plums that date back to the 17th and 18th century.
Growing multiple stone fruits, like peaches or plums, on one tree is possible because what Van Aken does, perhaps better than anybody, is graft.
In essence, he tricks a tree into adopting a new limb, or in this case, dozens of them.
The Tree of 40 Fruit has been growing for nine years. Fourteen are installed around the country, most in public places, like Van Aken’s at the center of the Syracuse campus — alive and edible.

read more: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/tree-of-40-forty-fruit-sam-van-aken/

beemill:

One Tree, 40 Types of Fruit

Ideas don’t grow on trees, until now.

Syracuse University Professor Sam Van Aken is the proud father of a single tree that grows 40 types of fruit. The artist’s rendering of his creation is getting attention worldwide, CBS News correspondent Jeff Glor reports.

"It’s flattering. It’s amazing. But yeah, it’s overwhelming," Van Aken said.

The art professor grew up on a farm in Pennsylvania. A few years ago, he learned New York’s agricultural experiment station — a 125-year-old institution that preserves and produces fruit — was going to rip up its stone fruit orchards.

So he set out to find a permanent home for seeds that trace back thousands of years.

"When I started, it was a matter of essentially collapsing an entire orchard down onto one tree. That was the practical application for it."

The result is not an entire orchard in one, but “a couple orchards in one.”

The tree contains 40 varieties of peaches, apricots, cherries, nectarines and European plums that date back to the 17th and 18th century.

Growing multiple stone fruits, like peaches or plums, on one tree is possible because what Van Aken does, perhaps better than anybody, is graft.

In essence, he tricks a tree into adopting a new limb, or in this case, dozens of them.

The Tree of 40 Fruit has been growing for nine years. Fourteen are installed around the country, most in public places, like Van Aken’s at the center of the Syracuse campus — alive and edible.

read more: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/tree-of-40-forty-fruit-sam-van-aken/

peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.
peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.
peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.
peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.
peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.
peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.
peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.
peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.
peonyandbee:

July garden update:
After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.
From left-right:
Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.
Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.
Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.
Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.

peonyandbee:

July garden update:

After more than enough rain, followed by a few days’ worth of hot, intense sun, followed by more rain, everything has exploded.  It’s dreary out there today which doesn’t make for the best photo-taking conditions, but it’ll do.

From left-right:

Potatoes are huge and beginning to flower, onion greens are starting to flop over and flower (almost time for harvest!), herbs are all sorts of productive.  Eggplants are starting to do their thing after a massive aphid attack almost took them all out.  Cherry tomatoes are abundant.

Borage flowers are almost ready to bloom, foxglove just popped, and the zucchini plants have exploded overnight.  I planted all of my cucurbits on the late side this year, trying to ward off the dreaded cucumber beetle.  Hope that works.  The garlic will be ready to harvest within the next week, I think.  Kale is now waist-high.  Peppers are leaning over with fruit and badly need support.  And those snap peas…we have been blessed with a bumper crop.  I keep picking them and they just keep on going.  My goal was to have enough for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, and maybe one or two more servings for the winter months.  We’ll have way more than enough.

Overall everything is doing well as long as I can keep the squirrels from digging it all up.  I could use a good solid day to get out there and weed/deadhead.  Maybe Sunday.  I did not take photos of the tomato plants because they’re on the other side of the house, and the neighbor is having a huge party.  I didn’t want to look like an asshole crawling around with my camera while they’re trying to have a good time.  I’ll get some photos this weekend.  We have some massive tomato plants this year, and every one is bearing fruit.  Hooray!  Also not shown: carrots, horseradish, lettuces, chards, strawberries, pineberries.  They’re all doing quite well.

Here’s the post of last month’s garden update if you want to compare where we were versus where we are now.

alexamayiborrowapencil:

Five sprouts from our cover crop. 

  1. Camera: Nikon D5100
  2. Aperture: f/3.5
  3. Exposure: 1/3200th
  4. Focal Length: 18mm
hqcreations:

jackassgardener:

biodiverseed:

The remarkable Egyptian Walking Onion, or Tree Onion.
These perennial alliums (Allium x proliferum) can grow over a metre in height, progressively creating new bulbs from the top (between 2-30, depending on the cultivar) while multiplying under the ground (between 5-6 new divisions from one bulb in a year).
Eventually, the stalks cannot bear the weight of so many bulblets, and fall over: re-sowing themselves.
These are an excellent choice for a food forest or perennial vegetable garden (alongside other edible perennials like artichokes, sunchokes, and asparagus).
#permaculture #forest gardening #edible landscaping #onions #perennial


My barber swears that if you eat these stalks before the flowers bloom that they taste just like apples. My barber also makes his own wine and sells it out of big jugs. And my barber has a vacuum cleaner for sale. And my barber taught me how to over-winter fig trees in Illinois by bending them over and building a little coffin around them and burying them in leaves. My barber is swell.I totally just snagged a runaway bulblet from a nursery. It’s rooting now. fingers crossed.

I have a bunch of these that I collected at a farm I volunteered at last year. I should plant them somewhere. hqcreations:

jackassgardener:

biodiverseed:

The remarkable Egyptian Walking Onion, or Tree Onion.
These perennial alliums (Allium x proliferum) can grow over a metre in height, progressively creating new bulbs from the top (between 2-30, depending on the cultivar) while multiplying under the ground (between 5-6 new divisions from one bulb in a year).
Eventually, the stalks cannot bear the weight of so many bulblets, and fall over: re-sowing themselves.
These are an excellent choice for a food forest or perennial vegetable garden (alongside other edible perennials like artichokes, sunchokes, and asparagus).
#permaculture #forest gardening #edible landscaping #onions #perennial


My barber swears that if you eat these stalks before the flowers bloom that they taste just like apples. My barber also makes his own wine and sells it out of big jugs. And my barber has a vacuum cleaner for sale. And my barber taught me how to over-winter fig trees in Illinois by bending them over and building a little coffin around them and burying them in leaves. My barber is swell.I totally just snagged a runaway bulblet from a nursery. It’s rooting now. fingers crossed.

I have a bunch of these that I collected at a farm I volunteered at last year. I should plant them somewhere. hqcreations:

jackassgardener:

biodiverseed:

The remarkable Egyptian Walking Onion, or Tree Onion.
These perennial alliums (Allium x proliferum) can grow over a metre in height, progressively creating new bulbs from the top (between 2-30, depending on the cultivar) while multiplying under the ground (between 5-6 new divisions from one bulb in a year).
Eventually, the stalks cannot bear the weight of so many bulblets, and fall over: re-sowing themselves.
These are an excellent choice for a food forest or perennial vegetable garden (alongside other edible perennials like artichokes, sunchokes, and asparagus).
#permaculture #forest gardening #edible landscaping #onions #perennial


My barber swears that if you eat these stalks before the flowers bloom that they taste just like apples. My barber also makes his own wine and sells it out of big jugs. And my barber has a vacuum cleaner for sale. And my barber taught me how to over-winter fig trees in Illinois by bending them over and building a little coffin around them and burying them in leaves. My barber is swell.I totally just snagged a runaway bulblet from a nursery. It’s rooting now. fingers crossed.

I have a bunch of these that I collected at a farm I volunteered at last year. I should plant them somewhere.

hqcreations:

jackassgardener:

biodiverseed:

The remarkable Egyptian Walking Onion, or Tree Onion.

These perennial alliums (Allium x proliferum) can grow over a metre in height, progressively creating new bulbs from the top (between 2-30, depending on the cultivar) while multiplying under the ground (between 5-6 new divisions from one bulb in a year).

Eventually, the stalks cannot bear the weight of so many bulblets, and fall over: re-sowing themselves.

These are an excellent choice for a food forest or perennial vegetable garden (alongside other edible perennials like artichokes, sunchokes, and asparagus).

#permaculture #forest gardening #edible landscaping #onions #perennial

My barber swears that if you eat these stalks before the flowers bloom that they taste just like apples. My barber also makes his own wine and sells it out of big jugs. And my barber has a vacuum cleaner for sale. And my barber taught me how to over-winter fig trees in Illinois by bending them over and building a little coffin around them and burying them in leaves. My barber is swell.

I totally just snagged a runaway bulblet from a nursery. It’s rooting now. fingers crossed.

I have a bunch of these that I collected at a farm I volunteered at last year. I should plant them somewhere.

erieforage:

This is cool, I took some pics of last week when I first setup the coop around a new apple tree, and how it looked a week later. There were wood chips from last year under the weeds, and they did not get it all. I still think its cool though. They are like little landscapers.
erieforage:

This is cool, I took some pics of last week when I first setup the coop around a new apple tree, and how it looked a week later. There were wood chips from last year under the weeds, and they did not get it all. I still think its cool though. They are like little landscapers.
erieforage:

This is cool, I took some pics of last week when I first setup the coop around a new apple tree, and how it looked a week later. There were wood chips from last year under the weeds, and they did not get it all. I still think its cool though. They are like little landscapers.

erieforage:

This is cool, I took some pics of last week when I first setup the coop around a new apple tree, and how it looked a week later. There were wood chips from last year under the weeds, and they did not get it all. I still think its cool though. They are like little landscapers.