erieforage:

This is cool, I took some pics of last week when I first setup the coop around a new apple tree, and how it looked a week later. There were wood chips from last year under the weeds, and they did not get it all. I still think its cool though. They are like little landscapers.
erieforage:

This is cool, I took some pics of last week when I first setup the coop around a new apple tree, and how it looked a week later. There were wood chips from last year under the weeds, and they did not get it all. I still think its cool though. They are like little landscapers.
erieforage:

This is cool, I took some pics of last week when I first setup the coop around a new apple tree, and how it looked a week later. There were wood chips from last year under the weeds, and they did not get it all. I still think its cool though. They are like little landscapers.

erieforage:

This is cool, I took some pics of last week when I first setup the coop around a new apple tree, and how it looked a week later. There were wood chips from last year under the weeds, and they did not get it all. I still think its cool though. They are like little landscapers.

pluralistfarmer:

Leek done gone to seed.

(Source: tefran)

medicinegardens:

a little #stjohnswort in #vodka for a little winter #stash ! amazes me every time how quickly it turns #red. #iloveherbs !!!

"

Just because a company is organic doesn’t mean it’s progressive. Exhibit A: Eden Foods. Like Hobby Lobby, Eden Foods sued the Obama administration to try to get out of providing contraceptive coverage for its employees. Eden Foods is a Michigan-based business that bills itself as “the oldest natural and organic food company in North America.” It is solely owned by Michael Potter, a Catholic who refers to birth control pills as “lifestyle drugs” and likes to whine about “unconstitutional government overreach.” (More crazy quotes from him below.)

In Eden Foods Inc. v. Kathleen Sebelius, filed in federal court in March of 2013, the company claimed its religious freedom was being violated by the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that employee health insurance cover birth control. The suit argued that “contraception or abortifacients … almost always involve immoral and unnatural practices.” In October, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decided against Eden Foods, ruling that a for-profit company cannot exercise religion.

But then, on June 30, the Supreme Court ruled in the Hobby Lobby case that family-owned, “closely held” companies can use religion as an excuse to flout the birth control mandate. Eden Foods is one of a few dozen “closely held” for-profit companies that have filed suit over the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate. On July 1, the Supreme Court ordered the 6th Circuit Court to reconsider its decision against Eden Foods and another plaintiff with a similar case.

"
  1. Camera: Nikon D5100
  2. Aperture: f/3.5
  3. Exposure: 1/400th
  4. Focal Length: 18mm

grand-bazaar:

1960s Philippines Rice planting

thatscienceguy:

Crops Before Selective Breeding

"etc." = collard greens, cauliflower, kohlrabi. (Brassica oleracea!)

"

Inmates are making a surprising array of products for small businesses. You can even find some in your local Whole Foods.

Some years back, a small Colorado goat-cheese maker called Haystack Mountain faced its version of a classic growth challenge: National demand was growing for its chèvres and other cheeses, and the company was struggling to find enough local goat farmers to produce milk. The solution came from a surprising source: Colorado Corrections Industries (CCI). Today six inmates milk 1,000 goats twice a day on a prison-run farm. After non-inmate employees cultivate the cheese at a company facility, it’s sold in Whole Foods WFM -0.36% outlets, among other stores.

Prison labor has gone artisanal. Sure, plenty of inmates still churn out government office furniture and the like, and incarcerated workers have occasionally been used by large companies since the late 1970s. Nationwide 63,032 inmates produce more than $2 billion worth of products a year, most of them sold to government entities.

"

Prison labor’s new frontier: Artisanal foods (x)

Sold at your local Whole Foods on the backs of forced labor

(via chupnaraho)

garden2mabelly:

Dragon Arugula, delish and seems to hold up in the heat well.